Tag Archives: Kwanzaa

Christmas Time is Here

Christmas time is here
Happiness and cheer
Fun for all
The children call
Favorite time of year
Snowflakes in the air
Carols everywhere
Olden times
And ancient rhymes
Love and dreams to share

These are the lyrics to one of my favorite secular Christmas songs ever. I love Christmas music. Secular music, religious music, orchestral music, carols, hymns, if it’s Christmas, I like it and I’ll listen to it. Christmas is important for so many reasons as Christians celebrate the birth of Jesus Christ as well as celebrating the principles of giving to others.

Sadly we have lost focus of the season. Christmas has always been a Christian holiday (here’s a hint: Christmas and Christian both start with Christ) which has never been a real problem in a nation founded on Christian principles. It is those principles that are creating the big problem, however. One of the founding principles was freedom for all to practice their own religious ideals with no inference from Government. This is where the “separation of church and state” gets its meaning.

People get confused by this separation however. They seem to think it means that you cannot practice your religion if it offends someone, or you cannot practice it without including all other religions. Well, this is fallacy. Christians celebrate the birth of the savior in December. We know that he was not actually born on December 25th, but that is not the point. The point is that we set aside a day to celebrate the occasion. This sense of inclusion has led to the month of December being recognized as “The Holiday Season,” which gives everyone an excuse to celebrate something. Hanukah and Kwanzaa have been added to the mix which serves to further dilute the significance of Christmas.

Jews do not celebrate Christ’s birth, because Jews do not believe he is the messiah; they celebrate Hanukah in December. It coincides with the Christmas season, but not the actual day, and it has nothing to do with Christ, but rather celebrates the rededication of the Holy Temple at Jerusalem. They light a candle for eight days to recognize the miracle of the candle oil, where the temple was out of consecrated oil and only had enough for one day. It lasted, however for eight days, which is the time it takes to press, prepare and consecrate olive oil.

Kwanzaa has no religious significance whatsoever. It is celebrated in December just to give African-Americans a celebration of their own separate from the dominate holiday of the season. It was created in 1967 but did not gain acceptance until much later. The founder of Kwanzaa claimed that Jesus was psychotic and that Christianity was a white religion that blacks should shun.

The media—having become the mouthpiece for the liberal agenda—has become an avid supporter of inclusion for the “Holiday Season,” even to the extreme of refusing to use the phrase Merry Christmas, opting to use the diluted “Happy Holidays” instead. Seems Merry Christmas is too Christian. Schools have dropped the Christmas Pageant and now have a holiday concert where secular songs are sung, but no religious hymns or songs.

Sadly, we as a people, do not help matters. The tradition of giving gifts has evolved into nothing more than a marketing scheme for retailers to gain profits. The day after Thanksgiving, traditionally heralded the beginning of the Christmas season, is now simple called “Black Friday,” because it is the day that merchants books actually show a profit. News broadcasts are full of stories of sales and people who do ridiculous things to save money buying things at stores. The stores do not even wait for Black Friday anymore. They start hanging “Happy Holidays” signs before Halloween these days. Celebrating giving has evolved into celebrating buying.

Christmas time is here and it used to mean something. It meant celebrating God’s love, Christ’s birth and giving of ourselves to others—and it needs to mean this again. This is what we need to remember this Christmas season. This needs to be held close as we gather family around the hearth and table and this is what needs to be honored as we exchange gifts with loved ones. Play your favorite Christmas music whether it be carols, hymns or secular. Merry Christmas to all.

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