Tag Archives: travel

Where To Find West Texas Jewels

Forty miles southeast of Lubbock, Texas, at the intersection of Highways 84 and 380, on a small parcel of flat land, rests a little jewel of Texas history. The town owes its founding to a cereal magnate and its continued existence to the energy industry, but it has more going for it than the acrid smell of crude oil and rows upon rows of wind farms on the horizon. Most people driving down Highway 84 are coming from or going to Lubbock, home of Texas Tech University, or on to Amarillo. But Post, Texas is still home to a number of die-hard West Texans who live and work in the 100-year-old town. Many of the residents have lived their entire lives there, while others left at some point to find their fortunes but ended up returning with a family. One unique sort of resident was discovered in Post but has now found a permanent home on display across the state in the Houston Museum of Natural Science. This small, desert gem of a town offers a Texas-sized portion of history, culture, and art.

Garza County Museum

Linda Puckett’s husband’s family were long-time Post residents, so when she and her husband returned to Post in 1980, it was a homecoming of sorts. The Pucketts owned a trucking company at the time, but Linda quickly found her calling when the C.W. Post Historical Center needed help. In her role as director, Linda has overseen a mass expansion of the museum’s collection, including gathering items from local Post residents such as Alvin G. Davis, a renowned cowboy featured in a large room dedicated to his rodeo days and philanthropic activities. “He is the highest honored 4-H member to date. He’s quite a guy. He’s still living; we have a living legend.”

Building the collection has been a passion for Linda since she took over the museum in 1995, which meant a lot of work. “I’ve been here 22 years now. We started with three rooms and nothing and now we have a huge historical museum.” The museum is housed in the old Post Sanatorium, which served as the town hospital for a number of years. Next door is a building that served as a nursing school. “There really was nothing here; we’ve totally revamped the whole interior. Once [the residents] saw we were here to stay, they didn’t mind us having grandma’s stuff. We ended up with a lot of stuff, so now I have to be kind of selective.”

The town’s namesake, C.W. Post, is not underrepresented in the museum. Linda was quite happy when the Post estate called asking if she wanted the furniture from Post’s Battleground, Michigan office. The chairs and desk had been stored at the Hillwood Museum in Washington D.C. at Post’s daughter’s home, but the agent in charge of the display needed the space, so he thought of Linda. She has established a relationship with the estate over the years and now proudly displays artifacts from Post’s office. There is so much in the museum that Linda is planning on a massive expansion in the near future which may include building an annex to the museum dedicated to Post. “We’re running out of room inside. We have Mr. Post’s stuff in the hallway.”

OS Museum

C.W. Post built the town after obtaining the land from several ranchers; one of them was Wilson Connell, who sold Post 27,000 of his 160,000 acres and left the rest of his land to his family. Among those sections of land was the OS Ranch, named for Overall and Street, the original land owners and founders of the ranch who sold to Connell back in the 1800s.

In the building Post built on Main Street in 1911 as an office for his land and cattle company, the OS Museum now resides, independently owned and operated by the descendants of Connell. While the Garza County Museum features artifacts from residents of Post, the OS Museum features collections from around the world and has little to do with the town’s history other than its location. The late Giles McCrary, grandson of William Connell, started the museum to feature artifacts and artwork collected by the family as they traveled over the years. Christie Morris, assistant curator, explained that McCrary wanted to provide access to art that most people will not get a chance to experience. The museum rotates themed displays that change at Easter, summer, and Christmas. One of the most significant additions to the collection are the assortment of the famed Fabergé Eggs. “Mr. McCrary set the whole thing up as a nonprofit. The family doesn’t charge anything for it; we just want to make these things available to the people who live in the area and the people who come through.”

Those people include the residents as well as visitors. “We have people from literally all over the world. We have a lot of people passing through; a lot of people will stop to maybe see something downtown. All Post’s merchants are really good about promoting one another. A lot of times someone will come up and say that ‘I was down in so-in-so shop and they said I had to come see this.’ We get a lot of people from Tech as parents are driving through and they’ll stop and sometimes bring people back and they’ll stop in and see us.”

Postosuchus

One resident of the Post area that brings people to town moved away and will probably never return, although he takes with him an indelible part of the town. He is named for Post, Texas, as his formal name is Postosuchus Kirkpatriki, but he is more commonly called Postosuchus. The large animal lived in Post in the late Triassic era and David Temple, Assistant Director of Paleontology at the Houston Museum of Natural Science, is quick to point out that Postosuchus is not a dinosaur, he is a reptile. “This is really before the dinosaurs came along and you have these things which are essentially reptiles. Dinosaurs appear at the end of the Triassic and into the Jurassic.”

Researchers still visit the Post excavation from time to time for more study. The skeleton on display in Houston is not as large as a Tyrannosaurus Rex, but is similar in size to a Velociraptor. Researchers from nearby Texas Tech who regularly visit the dig site posit that Postosuchus may have been able to walk on his hind legs, but was probably a quadraped, according to studies of his skeleton. Temple said that the research was conducted using pieces of different specimens. Scientists unfortunately did not find an entire intact skeleton, but did find enough to identify Postosuchus, despite return trips to the excavation.

“We’ve been out there twice. We spent two or three days straight, ten hours a day and we didn’t really find much of anything. When you find stuff, it’s where you find it but its not everywhere. It’s kind of spotty.”

This little stretch of Highway 84 sees more traffic than one might expect from this West Texas area outside of Lubbock. Between scientists, residents, visitors, and Red Raiders driving to and from Texas Tech, the town gets a notable amount of visitors. Linda Puckett enjoys being on the route in and out of town. “We are the last stop before the interstate. We’re a good pit stop.”

So whether you find yourself traveling through the area and need a place to rest or looking for an out-of-theordinary day trip for the family, Post has plenty to offer. And if you visit on a Saturday, Puckett suggests visiting the Ragtown Gospel Theater, just north of town, for a matinée.

 

This article appears in the October, 2017 issue of TexasLiving Magazine.

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Heaven In a Plain Wrapper

One of my favorite things about travelling is getting to find new places to eat. I always try to avoid hitting the chain places in favor of local independent eateries. Of course sometimes I will still go to Chili’s or Cheddars because it is convenient, but I try to find new places as often as possible. My trip to Colorado afforded me many opportunities to eat at new places, but tonight’s dinner location was noteworthy for its mix of good and bad.

DiCicco’s is an Italian restaurant near the Denver Airport nestled among a collection of hotels. It is in a big, uninviting building with a solid door, no windows and a patio that is loaded down with equipment and not used for seating. Upon entering the edifice, one gets a sense of entering an expensive boutique restaurant, but instead of a hostess stand, diners face a counter with a cash register, and what looks like a server stand. The hostess did not react to me for several moments until I asked where the hostess stand was. After clearing up my confusion, she asked if I wanted to sit in the bar area or the dining room. I was taken to the two-story dining room and seated in an intimate two-person booth adorned with very pretty hand-painted floral patterns on the walls. These paintings were all over the restaurant including the ceiling and vents. One wall of the dining room was a large screen showing video of Andrea Bocelli singing in a concert. I would later find out that on weekends, the videos are replaced with live entertainment in the form of a keyboardist and once a month they feature a live band.

Brandon, my waiter, was quite knowledgeable about the restaurant’s history and the menu. He seemed pleasant and nice, but he forgot my soda and took an inordinate amount to time coming back to take my order. I asked a few questions about some of the choices and settled on the cannelloni with meatballs and minestrone. I was glad I did. Unfortunately, however, the cannelloni came out before the minestrone. The soft drink glasses were quite small, necessitating several refills, of which Brandon was not as attentive as I would like.

The highlight of the dinner was the dinner. The cannelloni was the best I have had. Every bite was a bit of heaven covered in mozzarella. The meatballs, smothered in marinara, were delectable and accented the cannelloni very well. Even the minestrone, when it finally arrived, was quite good to the point I spooned every bit of the broth I could reach stopping only when my spoon came up empty. I cannot remember a more tasty Italian dinner.

If only it was served in a more accommodating environment.

This is not to say that the dining room was drab or distracting from the dinner. As I mentioned earlier, the entire interior is festooned with impressive hand-painted artwork on the walls—not canvases hanging on the walls—but rather murals covering almost all of the plaster. The problem was the fact that the impressive adornments are only on the interior of an uninviting building. The front door is solid wood with no windows. Similarly, the windows that are on the walls are plastered over. As I mentioned earlier, the building has a two-story patio that would offer diners a spectacular view of sunset over the Rocky Mountains, but the patio is closed and filled with excess equipment, which is quite unattractive.

DiCicco’s has very good food and it is worth the trip for that. The only problem is one has to get past the uninviting building to get it. If the restaurant was not one of only two in the immediate area, I might not have even bothered to enter it. The exterior is not inviting and the foyer did little to change the impression. It is only when one enters the dining room does the restaurant become somewhat promising. It is only when the food is served does the place shine, and it shines brightly.

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Off The Beaten Path

I have mentioned in past blogs that my wife and I enjoy driving out of the city to see as much of small-town America as we can. We have been through most of the small towns around Houston, San Antonio and Austin and have thoroughly enjoyed those visits, but that means that now we have to venture out farther and farther. This weekend, we drove to Oklahoma and passed through a number of small and not-so-small towns, such as Harrison and Henderson before going through Kilgore and Longview. Our route took us along highway 259 to our destination in Idabel, Oklahoma, but not before detouring us along other roads on several occasions. Sometimes the best discoveries are made when one leaves the planned path.

The weather on this trip couldn’t have been better had we controlled it. While hot for a summer day in Texas, it wasn’t the hottest day of the year. In fact, for a late July day, it did not even break a hundred degrees. The sky was mostly sunny with just enough clouds to break up the blue expanse and also be interesting. I did read on my news feed that some parts of Houston got serious rainfall, but fortunately we missed it. Traffic was light and the drive pleasant as we jammed to our favorites playlist over the Bluetooth on the car stereo. Since we both have family in Arkansas, we have travelled highway 59 more than most truckers over the years, but once we hit Nacogdoches, this trip would have us veer off our usual course and onto highway 259. It was a beautiful drive for a federal highway. There were many beautiful homes and ranches along the drive, and the setting sun cast gorgeous diffuse light that brought the country to life highlighting warm yellows and ambers. As we drove along, we passed a large red barn, with horses frolicking in the setting sunlight framed by ripe corn fields waiting to be harvested.

After we passed Daingerfield, Texas, we were detoured onto highway 67 in Omaha. I had been looking for someplace to eat ever since we passed a Grandy’s in Longview. Michelle is not the Grandy’s fanatic that I am and she wasn’t hungry then. By the time we approached Omaha, however, she was getting hungry. I was near starving. We didn’t see many places to eat on Google maps that sounded good, so I said let’s keep an eye out and we might find something interesting. Now, in this day of technology dependence where people are afraid to venture out of their homes without internet access on a mobile device, most people rely on Google to show them where to go. I use the technology as well, but I am not dependent on it. And I will maintain that statement until the day my cloud drive crashes. Anyway, after we drove along 67 for a short time, Michelle saw a sign that made her chuckle: The Rear of the Steer. It was for a barbeque place just off the highway with a full parking lot.

“Stop!” I insisted. “Turn around. We HAVE to eat there. We can’t pass a place called ‘the rear of the steer’ and not eat there.”

After some debate, she agreed and pulled over to turn around. There was only one other car on the road, so we had no problem with traffic. Omaha is so small that it looked as though most of the town was already at the Rear of the Steer. Inside, there was a small line at the counter to order, but as most of these people were probably regulars, it went quickly. We ordered and sat in a place that looked as though it had been there since the 50’s. It was quite clean, and well maintained, but the décor was not retro; it was authentic.

So was the food. I had the hamburger steak while Michelle had the chicken fried steak and both meals were quite good. We sat and listened to some of the other patrons as they talked about their day, shared stories and jokes. One gentleman told his companion the story of how the place got its name. Evidently it is very well known for its hamburgers, and hamburger is taken from the Rear of the Steer. As this couple left the place, he yelled to no one visible “See you later, old man,” to which the reply “Take Care” came from an unseen voice back in the kitchen. Later, the owner of that voice would come out bearing several plates of food, looking very much like Mel, from Mel’s Diner on the TV show “Alice”, only dressed better. He said hi to everyone he passed and stopped to talk to more than one before hurrying off to the kitchen for more food.

We liked the place so much I bought a T-shirt. It was a great beginning to the weekend that promises more good times, especially if we remain open to leaving the planned path every once in a while. Which is kind of the point of the trip.

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Reaching For the Sky

I spent a week in Colorado this past month for recertification and it reaffirmed a feeling I have had for a number of years now.  I belong in the mountains.  I have no family history that I know of to account for this feeling.  My family hails from Arkansas and the history follows a path through Missouri, Texas and the Carolinas (I think).  Granted, there are mountains in Arkansas, but we never lived near them.  We’re coastal people; North Little Rock, my birthplace, sits on the Arkansas River across from Little Rock, and Houston is on the Gulf Coast.  We have lived in Louisiana and on the peninsula in Virginia as well.  No mountains.  Maybe that’s why.
Something about the way they reach majestically toward the heavens, snagging passing clouds, covered in snow in the hottest times of the year and looming over the plains below makes them seem indomitable.  That they are there year round, unmoving, the only limitations on access being man-made, gives a sense of permanence in a constantly changing world. 
As I become more frustrated with the current political/social climate in this country, I dream of escaping to a mountain retreat.  A secret bunker hollowed out of a remote mountain where I can hole up and enjoy quiet time with my wife without the hustle and bustle of city life sounds almost idyllic.  Of course, this is a pipe dream as I found when visiting Colorado; the mountain sides are covered by the spreading fungus of subdivisions of houses and strip malls.  Even the “Top Secret” NORAD base featured in the TV series Stargate SG1 is visible from Colorado Springs as the town has spread up the hill.  You can also see one of the most familiar geological landmarks in the country from there.

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I drove to the summit of Pike’s Peak along a long, winding road past several impressive, expansive vistas, jutting rocks and picturesque mountain lakes.  I saw deer, hawks, and other wild animals along the way.  I also saw about a hundred bicyclists, dozens of motorcyclists and bus loads of other tourists at the several gift shops, restaurants and pullouts along the way.  There are fast food places not 10 minutes from the gate to Pike’s Forest park as well as shopping centers.  Of course, Pike’s Peak is a tourist destination so that’s to be expected.  I’m sure there are more remote locations in the Rocky Mountains; at least I hope so. 
To be able to wake up in the morning, cast open the curtains and see the splendour of the sunrise lighting up the mountainside is a dream worth pursuing.  Spending an evening on the patio watching the setting sun cast the mountains in silhouette against the palette of muave and lavender skies while barbequeing seems an ideal toward which to strive.

image

My wife and I spent a week last summer in the Grand Teton national park, at the northern most edge of the rockies, and we fell in love with that mountain range.  We said right then that we would love to live in that area someday.  I’m thinking someday sooner than later.  Every time I see pictures of our trips to the mountains, I hear a siren’s call to return to the rolling foothills and jutting peaks.  If only I didn’t have to earn money to survive.  There are factors keeping us from packing up today.  We have a house here, we have kids and grandkids here, and we have jobs and school to finish here.  I get frustrated that we can’t just get up and go right now.  Heck, I could even jump on the motorcycle and be riding instead of typing this.  I do tend to get impatient from time to time.
Someday.  Someday soon.

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G’nip G’nop

I was a ping pong ball today. Well, actually, I have been getting knocked back and forth since last week. Have you ever been told one thing, only to be told the exact opposite thing shortly after? Not the simple yes/no/maybe; I’m talking flip flopping 6 times before getting a final answer. I’m still not certain the issue won’t change at least one more time before it is too late to do anything about it.

Last week, I was in a training planning meeting to discuss a new product rollout and the corporate office had set up a train-the-trainer session in Denver for our partners. It was mentioned that a trainer from our office should attend and my name was put forward to go. Now, I like travelling, even if it is for business, as long as it isn’t for too long or too often, so I had no real issues with going. I mean, it is my job after all. Besides, it is a chance to eat good on the company dime. I have enjoyed some wonderful meals at wonderful restaurants on these trips. And who doesn’t like seeing new sights?

So, I was told to make plans to go. I did. I rescheduled some training I was scheduled to teach and looked up flight information. I was all set when I got an email from my boss just before the end of the day that the plans had changed and I was not going. Ok, I figure no problem. I’m flexible. It’s one of the aspects of my personality that I count among the best. You have to be adaptable if you want to grow and improve yourself, right? Besides, I had a class on schedule this week anyway. I went home, told Michelle that I was supposed to go, but then not and we had a laugh about it and that was that. She even said how much she wished we could both go.

The next day, at the follow up planning meeting, my boss said to me “David, can you be ready to go to Denver?” Ok, I figure that business plans change. We, as professionals, need to be adaptable. Sure, I can be ready to go. No problem. My boss told me to wait to book until she confirms with division, but that I should consider it a go. At least until I hear otherwise. Well, I heard otherwise by the close of business. No go. This was Friday.

This morning, I check my email and there is a message from the boss saying to be ready to go. Followed about an hour later by a message to wait until I hear more. I reply to that email only to get an auto message saying the boss was out of office. Well, how am I supposed to hear more? When I finally get through, I am told to go ahead and book the trip. I do that. I dutifully whip out the credit card and book the flight, the hotel and the rental car. It is snowing in Denver, by the way. I love snow. It’s so pretty. Then corporate emails me and asks “why are you coming to this training? It isn’t for you, it’s for the partners.” So, the boss says cancel the trip.

G’nip G’nop.

So, as of right now, I am NOT going to Denver. But that could change. The training doesn’t start until 9 am Denver time. I could still make it if they tell me to go before 5 am Tuesday. After all, this ping pong ball still has some bounce left in it.

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